Lisbon – Tramways and Seafood

September 15th, 2015

Lisbon – Tramways and SeafoodTo document the network of the Metropolitano de Lisboa as a part of my photo project I made it back to the capital of Portugal. Funnily enough I booked the flight exactly for the same weekend of September like I did 8 years ago, when I put my feet in Lisbon ground for the first time. Eight years is a good period allowing to compare things and recognise developments as well as changes. The gem at the banks of Tajo River is still a jewel that’s captivating its visitors with a very own charm, a mix of old and new, with historic tramways, a lovely old town as well as stunning modern architecture at Parque das Nações, that is home of worldwide unique Oceanario aquarium »»

Salt with Pepper – The underground Chapel of Wieliczka

April 14th, 2015

Salt with Pepper – The underground Chapel of WieliczkaThe South Polish town of Wieliczka hosts a very special UNESCO World Heritage: one of the oldest salt mines on our planet hosting the world’s largest underground chapel. Being located approximately 100 metres below the surface, the chamber got carved into the rock salt under the village whose name literally means “Great Salt”. With only some 20 kilometres distance from Krakow, Wieliczka is definitely worth a day trip »»

Oberbaum, Berlin Wall and so on…

November 9th, 2014

Oberbaum, Berlin Wall and so on…Berlin-based bridge Oberbaumbrücke is a symbol for many things: Where nowadays cars, metros and tourists cross Spree River from north to south, was once the border between the East and the West. The former border strip was guided by the course of the river; a route, that today is famous for pleasure boat trips. The towers of Oberbaumbrücke are not only identity-establishing for the directly neighbouring club Watergate, but stand first and foremost for the vicinity of Berlin and Brandenburg. Also in my life Oberbaumbrücke played an important role, as it was my first contact with the West after the Berlin Wall fell down »»

Auckland’s architectural Side

May 20th, 2014

Auckland’s architectural SideActually Wellington is the capital, but when it comes to business and logistics then Greater Auckland pulls all strings and due to its international airport for tourists this metropolis is to boot the gateway number one to cross into New Zealand, hence for many people in the world this city makes the initial contact. Auckland’s down town is pretty much compact and an area of high housing density. When watched from far away distance by the help of a super tele lens, Auckland’s skyline and its facades offer a variety of interesting details, not to mention the spectacle when they reflect in rain puddles. Most dominating among those skyscrapers is the Sky Tower, from where you can see Auckland’s volcanic history »»

The Tunnelbana Netherworlds of the Stockholm Metro

May 9th, 2014

The Tunnelbana Netherworlds of the Stockholm MetroWhat do Ebba, Knut, Greta and Elvis have in common? Correct: all of them are true blue, come across the “wrong” side and run in Stockholm’s underground solely. But what sounds a bit like a scattered group of weirdoes is actually black-blue, made of metal and dedicated to transport people: the Tunnelbana, Stockholm’s metro, where every of its coaches has its own name. Quite likeable, isn’t it? But the real gem of the Swedish metropolitan underground is the variety of its stations since in particular the subterranean stops are brought to the fore artistically making every stage telling a very own optically exciting story. »»

Photo Series featuring Berlin’s Metro Network

March 19th, 2014

Photo Series featuring Berlin’s Metro NetworkThe German capital can look back on a worldwide unique history and of course the city’s constructional countenance gives a very good reflection of that. Against the background of other European capitals Berlin seems to skip a couple of urban development stages. Despite constructional blunders and demolition one of the best history tellers is still around, that is the city’s infrastructure, in particular the underground transportation, its diverse tunnels and various stations. When having a closer look they reveal a stunning piece of Berlin’s chronicles as well as contemporary stories »»

Berlin’s Olympia Stadium in Black and White

May 10th, 2013

Berlin’s Olympia Stadium in Black and WhiteMany of Berlin’s places of interest, no matter if built for “perpetuity” or perpetually not being accomplished, are often hard-wired to a single name. Ulbricht has his TV Tower, Wowereit his BBI airport desaster and Honecker dreamed of a 100 years lasting wall. In the 1930’s such dreams year-lasting-wise even had one more zero in the end and threw Germany as well as the rest of the world into turmoil. Only a few witnesses reminding of that time are left, for example Berlin’s mighty Olympiastadion, a massive stadium built by Werner March in the west of the city. Photographically I am interpreting its lines and geometry in dramatic contrasts and in Black and White only »»

Impressions from Berlin II

July 24th, 2012

Impressions from Berlin IIHere is the second instalment of my photo series Impressions from Berlin. After two weeks of rain and crazy weather changes the sun came out again and showed some nice summer performance giving some lovely evening side light that turned the glass fascades of the modern buildings at Potsdamer Platz into a playground for mirroring clouds »»

Istanbul – Turkey’s hidden Capital

June 1st, 2012

Istanbul – Turkey’s hidden CapitalIt’s an open secret that I am taking a great fancy to Istanbul, the world’s only city being situated on two different continents. Since my first visit in 2007 many things have changed. For example now Hagia Sophia and Süleymaniye Mosque are shining in new splendour after having been restored for several years. The city’s biggest highlight is yet still the Bosporus and its mass of water appearing in a new colour every day anew. This time my stay also was long enough to have a look at the Little Hagia Sophia as well as at other mosques like the one in Eminönü or Kabatas »»

Jaipur – Rajasthan’s Pink Panther

February 28th, 2011

Jaipur – Rajasthan’s Pink PantherRetina tickling pink is traditionally Rajasthan‘s colour of hospitality. To the Rajputs this symbolic colour is so much important that their capital’s Old Town once got a Barbie-like coat of paint. Jaipur is like a panther on the jump: graceful, but full of energy that is waiting to get released. It is the buzzing and bustling home of more than 2 million people as well as university city, industrial town and a shining light for all things called culture. Maharaja Jai Singh II. formed Jaipur and built impressive monuments like the Palace of the Winds, the Palace of Water or World’s biggest solar clock; all got framed by imposing fortifications like picturesque Fort Jaigarh or massive Fort Nahargarh »»